Apprentice Abbie cooks up a tasty profit

January 4, 2017


Schoolgirl Abbie Freeman has raised money for FORCE with a project that billionaire businessman Lord Sugar would no doubt applaud.

The Apprentice star hired baker Alana Spencer as his business partner at the end of the 2016 series.

But Abbie had already proved that making cakes was a profitable project with her school’s own version of BBC reality show.

She provided an extremely healthy return on her initial investment as part of a challenge for Year 7 pupils at St Peter’s School in Lympstone, designed to encourage their entrepreneurial spirit in a fun way.

Pupils were given £5 to use for interesting and enterprising ideas on the St Peter’s Apprentice programme with a guarantee that nobody would be fired!

Abbie used the investment to buy ingredients for making chocolate cakes and tarts, which she sold at athletics events in which she was competing.

Added generosity

She sold 40 chocolate chip cupcakes and 24 tarts to realise a profit of £25.94.

The proceeds were split between FORCE and the Lendwithcare charity project, which allows individuals and groups to make small loans to entrepreneurs in developing countries and help them work their way out of poverty.

Abbie’s generosity to FORCE didn’t end there. She topped up the amount with £12.03 from her own pocket money to make a £25 donation to our charity.

“I wanted to raise money for FORCE because my mum had cancer and the charity helped her in many ways,” said Abbie.

“I hope they will use the money I raise to help other people who have been diagnosed with cancer.

Nervous and excited

“I made the chocolate tarts and the chocolate chip cupcakes independently, I carefully stored them by keeping them refrigerated and I made a sign advertising my cakes. It was easy to keep them in a cooler bag then set up my stand at the athletics event.

“Because I was also competing in these events, I set my stall up so that people could come along and help themselves, then put the required money for the cakes in the tin. I wasn’t expecting a lot of money from this therefore I was very surprised that I had sold practically every cake.

“At the start of the project I was little bit nervous but very excited about what I should make, how much I would raise etc.

“I thought it was going to be really fun to make cakes then sell them because I liked the idea of someone eating some of my homemade produce, although I was a little worried if someone didn’t like my produce or I didn’t sell much.”

She clearly needn’t have had any concerns – and after success on The Apprentice, perhaps it’s next stop Great British Bake Off!

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